Last edited by Tezuru
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Satavahana coins in the Andhra Pradesh Govt. Museum found in the catalog.

Satavahana coins in the Andhra Pradesh Govt. Museum

Andhra Pradesh Government Museum.

Satavahana coins in the Andhra Pradesh Govt. Museum

by Andhra Pradesh Government Museum.

  • 310 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Govt. of Andhra Pradesh in Hyderabad .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Coins, Indic

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementby M. Ramarao. General editor: N. Ramesan.
    SeriesAndhra Pradesh Government Museum series -- no. 2, Museum series (Andhra Pradesh Government Museum) -- no. 2
    ContributionsRama Rao, M.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsCJ1391 A485
    The Physical Object
    Pagination69 p., 20 p. of plates :
    Number of Pages69
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19506947M

    VISAKHAPATNAM: There are a total of eight district museums, four site museums and one state-level museum in Andhra Union ministry of culture and . The coins of Srimukha were excavated near Kondapur Kotilingala. The wedding venue of King Hala, a ruler of satavahana empire, was at Draksharamam in Andhra Pradesh. In Nasik inscription of Gautami Balasri there was a mention of many hills namely; Mahendragiri, Siritani, Sathagiri. All these hills were in Andhra region.

    The Museums of Andhra Pradesh are a collective source of fruitful insight to the historical past of the state. Regarded as the storeroom of oldest of old antiquities, these Museums serve as the.   The Satavahanas ruled the western Deccan region, the region around Paithan (Pratishthana). They were regarded as the Andhras or Andhrabrityas (Andhra sevants). They were called so because they were of Andhra origin and their dynasty was identical with and confined to the Andhra country. The other name Andhrabritya led to the assumption that the Satavahanas.

    The ship-mast coins of Yajnasri Satakarni reveal the brisk maritime trade of the Satavahana period. From the gold coins of the Roman emperors unearthed in some parts of Andhra datable to the Satavahana-lkshvaku period, it may be concluded that the Romans carried on commerce with Andhra and paid gold dinars. Head of a lion, from gateway pillar at the Amaravati Stupa, Amaravati, Andhra Pradesh, India, Satavahana dynasty, 2nd century AD, limestone - Freer Gallery of Art - Capital: Amaravati.


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Satavahana coins in the Andhra Pradesh Govt. Museum by Andhra Pradesh Government Museum. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Satavahana coins in the Andhra Pradesh Govt. Museum. [M Rama Rao; Andhra Pradesh Government Museum.]. Includes: Gupta’s Punch-Marked Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Ramarao’s Satavahana Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Subrahmanyam’s A Catalogue of the Ikshvaku Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Gupta’s The Amaravati Hoard of Silver Punch-Marked Coins; Khan’s Bahmani Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum.

The Satavahanas also produced coins and some copper coins. They countermarked these coins by die-striking symbols such as the three-peaked hill and the Ujjain symbol on them. Such coins have been found at Jogalthambi in Maharashtra and Goa and few other places. The Satavahana coins display devices such as the hill, river, tree, Goddess Lakshmi, lion, tiger, elephant, bull, horse, camel.

The Satavahana rule is believed to have started around the third century BC, in BC and lasted until the second century AD. Some experts believe their rule started in the first century BC only. They are referred to as Andhras in the Puranas. The Satavahana kingdom chiefly comprised of modern-day Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Maharashtra.

The Satavahana coins, inscriptions and literature are the rich source of our knowledge about their administrative system. In this period the South was ruled over by the monarchies. King was the highest official of the Government and his office was hereditary.

Satavahanas issued coins of potin and lead. Ruler: Gautamiputra Sri Yajna Satakarni Year: - AD Unit: Ar 14mm, gm Obverse: Kings bust right, elaborate hair style Rano Gotamiputasa Siri Yana Satakarnisa. The coin legends of the Satavahanas, in all areas and all periods, used a Prakrit dialect without exception.

Some reverse coin legends are in Kannada & Telugu language,which seems to have been in use in their heartland abutting the Godavari, Kotilingala, Karimnagar in Telangana, Krishna, Amaravati, Guntur in Andhra Pradesh. This is the oldest museum in the city of Hyderabad.

Beside the Public Garden this building is itself a heritage building with an enchanting charisma. The A.P. State Museum has a large collection of stone and metal sculptures from ancient and medieval Andhra, from the Satavahana to the Ikshvaku periods.

Andhra Satavahanas: Origins 1st century according Ancient India Andau Andau inscriptions Andhra country Andhra kings Andhra-Satavahana AndhradeSa Aparanta Assaka BalaSri Rama Rao Rapson Raychaudhuri referred region regnal reign restruck Rudradaman Saka Salivahana Sastri Sata Satavahana Satavahana Coins Satavahana family Satavahana kings.

On the coins of Satavahana it appears with five or seven branches and is placed in a railing. The symbol has many religious connotations, indicating the tree worship prevailed during ancient India adopted by all religious sects.

Satavahana dynasty, Indian family that, according to some interpretations based on the Puranas (ancient religious and legendary writings), belonged to the Andhra jati (“tribe”) and was the first Deccanese dynasty to build an empire in daksinapatha—i.e., the southern region.

At the height of their power, the Satavahanas held distant areas of western and central India. (g) Possibly, Andhra is the Tribal name: Satavahana, the dynastic name, and satakarni, the Surname. SOURCES: (a) Puranas - mention 30 kings. (b) Aitrareya Brahmina. (c) Literary sources -- Gunadhya's Brihatkatha.

And Leelavati, which deals with the military exploits of Hala. (d). The coins are on display at the State Museum, Pradesh West Bengal Andhra Pradesh Bihar Karnataka coins dating back to the pre-Satavahana.

In possession of a large collection of rare coins, stamps, books and other artefacts, Damodar Rao will be exhibiting some rare coins from the pre-Satavahana period, notes and coins. Hyderabad area and described thirteen varieties of such coins as cast coins from Andhra ~radesh.*~ Siddiqui mentioned three more varieties of these coins found in Hyderabad area Rama Rao's Catalogue of Satavahana Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum includes aFile Size: 1MB.

Satavahana followed the Mauryas in Deccan of India. Satavahana dynasty ruled from Pune in Maharastra to Coastal Andhra Pradesh in the second century BC onwards. This dynasty was built up on the ruins of the Maurya Empire and around 1 st century AD, they were the most prominent in the Modern Andhra Pradesh Region.

Twelve publications, – Includes: Gupta’s Punch-Marked Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Ramarao’s Satavahana Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Subrahmanyam’s A Catalogue of the Ikshvaku Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Gupta’s The Amaravati Hoard of Silver Punch-Marked Coins; Khan’s.

The Andhra Pradesh Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, Issue 2: Contributor: Andhra Pradesh (India). Department of Archaeology and Museums: Publisher: Director of Archaeology and Museums, Government of Andhra Pradesh., Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Twelve publications, Includes: Gupta's Punch-Marked Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Ramarao's Satavahana Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Subrahmanyam's A Catalogue of the Ikshvaku Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Gupta's The Amaravati Hoard of Silver Punch-Marked Coins; Khan's Bahmani Coins in the Andhra Pradesh.

PM Satavahana Coins in the Andhra Pradesh Museum; Ramesan, Sri N., M.A., I.A.S PM A Catalog of the Vijyanagar Coins of the Andhra Pradesh Government Museum; Smith, V. PM Catalogue of coins in the Indian Museum, Vol.

1- Coins of Ancient India; Sultan, Jem. The on-site museum, which housed excavated artefacts, was pillaged by thieves thrice between October and March and has remained shut ever since.

Inthe state government initiated a conservation effort here, hoping to bring the Chandavaram Complex into the Buddhist circuit of Andhra Pradesh, and offer tourists a reason to travel.Andhra Pradesh Government Museum.

Gold and silver coins of Sultans of Delhi in the Andhra Pradesh State Museum, Hyderabad. Hyderabad: Govt. of Andhra Pradesh, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Mohd Abodul Wali Khan; Andhra Pradesh Government Museum. Well, with this book which I am sure is hella' out of date () I tried to Id this coin using the book.

Quick recap of the coin - Lead(ish) 21 mm x grams -Tall funky elephant right. Trunk raised,[unlinked Ujjani Symbol] over elephant's back.